Using brain ‘fingerprints’ to study and refine autism treatment

autism
[T]he National Institutes of Health has been supporting research into the ‘human connectome’— the collection of information pathways in the brain that coordinate sensation, emotion, action and thought.

The goal is to better understand how the 100 billion cells of the brain work together to perform the brain’s many functions. These complex interconnections shed light on the moment-to-moment activity of a typical brain, as well as how this activity can go awry in conditions such as autism.

In a 2014 paper, we formalized the phenomenon of a personalized brain signature — the idea that each person’s brain is uniquely wired.

ADVERTISEMENT

[T]he mental processes involved in solving a geometry problem or leading a staff meeting do not enlist identical neural pathways in every person. Much of the variation in activity tends to occur within the brain’s most sophisticated networks, the ones that relate to memory, thinking and decision-making.

Related article:  Treating brain damage and disorders with ‘wonder material’ graphene

Our next step is to do fMRI-derived brain fingerprinting in people with autism. From there, we aim to isolate clusters of individuals with autism whose connectotypes share common features.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Ultimately, we hope to classify the various brain-network profiles that are associated with autism. That information will help investigators test which treatments work best for which individuals with the condition. It may also help scientists zero in on the genetic underpinnings of the relevant neural networks.

Read full, original post: Unique brain ‘fingerprints’ may narrow search for autism subtypes

Outbreak Daily Digest
Biotech Facts & Fallacies
GLP Podcasts
Infographic: Deaths from COVID-19 are far higher than reported estimates

Infographic: Deaths from COVID-19 are far higher than reported estimates

More than 2.8 million people have lost their lives due to the pandemic, according to a Wall Street Journal analysis ...
News on human & agricultural genetics and biotechnology delivered to your inbox.
glp menu logo outlined

Newsletter Subscription

Optional. Mail on special occasions.
Send this to a friend