North American trade deal includes ‘science-based’ gene editing regulations

| | October 3, 2018

Farmers and agribusinesses welcomed the agreement on a new North American trade pact, easing fears that the Trump administration’s tough negotiating strategy could deepen economic struggles in the U.S. heartland.

The agreement …. between the U.S. and Canada, following an updated U.S.-Mexico trade deal agreed in August, is expected to preserve tens of billions of dollars in farm goods traded annually across the countries’ borders, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates.

Beyond preserving existing food sales, the new trade pact between the U.S., Mexico and Canada includes a new “science-based” framework for food safety standards, the Farm Bureau’s Mr. [David] Salmonsen said. Reviews of new genetically engineered seeds, including those created with new gene-editing technologies, would become more standardized, he said.

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Some environmental activists criticized the deal for loosening oversight of genetically engineered organisms, or GMOs, and synthetic chemical pesticides ….

Mexico and Canada have become critical pillars of demand and supply for the U.S. food and agriculture industry since Nafta took effect in 1994. Agricultural exports from the U.S. to Canada and Mexico have more than quadrupled in that time to $39 billion, according to the USDA ….

Read full, original article: U.S. Farmers Welcome New North American Trade Pact (Behind Paywall)

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Click the link above to read the full, original article.

3 thoughts on “North American trade deal includes ‘science-based’ gene editing regulations”

  1. Correction: ALL environmental activists criticized the deal for loosening oversight of genetically engineered organisms, or GMOs, and synthetic chemical pesticides

  2. This is a very important development. Because of the recent EU Court of Justice opinion on gene editing, and the fact that the EU has 28 votes, it is unlikely that any changes will be made to the Codex Guideline for GE foods. This is significant because Codex defines the regulated article as “a plant in which the genetic material has been changed through in vitro nucleic acid techniques, including recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and direct injection of nucleic acid into cells or organelles”, which would appear to cover all of the new gene editing related technologies. Most countries had incorporated the Codex Guideline into its laws and regulations as part of ratifying the Cartagena Biosafety Protocol. Thus, we are left with the option of US negotiating bi- and tri-lateral agreements, such as these, to reduce unreasonable and scientifically unsupportable data requirements, with the hope that, in the long run, enough countries will agree, and Codex can be changed.

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