Video: How ‘turning down’ gene expression in pests can help protect crops and bees

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varroa
Varroa mites on a worker honey bee.

In this video, CropLife International scientist Greg Heck discusses how researchers are using RNA interference (RNAi) to turn off or turn down the expression of genes in insects. The technique, used naturally by many organisms to restrict gene expression, may allow scientists to develop new pesticides to protect food crops from pests and bees from the Varroa mite, a virus-spreading insect widely believed by scientists to be the biggest threat to the pollinators today.

Related article:  Managed honeybee and bumble bee colonies in the US are up as much as 85%, a 60 year high, as independent researchers challenge bee apocalypse narrative
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