We don’t grow enough vegetables to feed everyone a healthy diet, study claims

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If everyone on the planet wanted to eat a healthy diet, there wouldn’t be enough fruit and vegetables to go around, according to a new University of Guelph study. A team of researchers compared global agricultural production with nutritionists’ consumption recommendations and found a drastic mismatch.

Published in the journal PLOS ONE, the study calculated the number of servings per person on the planet for each food group based on the Harvard University’s “Healthy Eating Plate” guide, which recommends that half of our diet consist of fruits and vegetables; 25 per cent, whole grains; and 25 per cent, protein, fat and dairy.

Because carbohydrates are relatively easy to produce and can feed many people, developing countries focus on growing grains ….

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[D]eveloped countries have subsidized grain and corn production for decades in order to become self-sufficient and to establish global leadership in their production. These countries have also spent far more money on research and innovation for these crops than for fruits and vegetables.

Read full, original article: Not enough fruits, vegetables grown to feed the planet, study reveals

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