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Here’s what DNA testing companies are doing with all that genetic data

| | December 19, 2018

In the past couple of years, genetic-testing companies like Ancestry and 23andMe have become popular for finding out family history and DNA information. They make for great gifts for family members and it’s a very attractive pitch to see “where you came from.” However, do you know where that information is being used and stored?

When you sign up to share your DNA with Ancestry, you opt-in for “informed consent research.” However, you have the ability to opt out of this when you first agree to the service.

Law enforcement can also obtain your DNA data with a court order. In fact, they recently caught The Golden State Killer by comparing online stored DNA after 32 years at large.

Related article:  Mental health apps are reading your texts—some of them are selling your data, raising privacy concerns

All of this collected data means is that your privacy could be at risk when it comes to your genetic makeup information. Leaks are common in the data world and a DNA leak would be much worse than a credit leak because simply, you cannot change your DNA. If leaked, this data could cause people to be genetically discriminated against by employers, insurance companies, banks, etc.

If you are uncomfortable with your DNA being sold to drug research or the possibility of a data leak, you can delete your DNA test results. Both sites have a step-by-step on deleting the data on their website.

Read full, original post: How DNA Companies Like Ancestry And 23andMe Are Using Your Genetic Data

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Click the link above to read the full, original article.
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