Aging as a preventable disease: Why living to 100 should be easy

young woman with photo of aged eye over her high res stock photography
Image: Dimitri Otis

Science is investigating some intriguing clues suggesting that aging and death may not be as inevitable as we thought.

David Sinclair believes aging is a disease, the most common disease, and he believes it should be aggressively treated. His book Lifespan: Why We Age and Why We Don’t Have To was published in September 2019.

He believes a loss of information is the singular reason why we age. Not just digital information, but epigenetic information that is analog rather than digital. He characterizes the genome as a computer and the epigenome as software. The genetic information is the same in every cell; the epigenome is what instructs a cell to develop into a kidney cell rather than a heart cell.

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Related article:  What’s your 'ageotype'? Classification system explains why some of us are older—or younger—than we look

Experiments with stem cells and cloning are intriguing. Gene therapy shows great promise but there are ethical concerns. Genetic analysis and new technologies are making great strides.

“If even a few of the therapies and treatments that are most promising come to fruition, it is not an unreasonable expectation for anyone who is alive and healthy today to reach 100 in good health.” [Sinclair said].

Read full, original post: Aging: Is It a Preventable Disease?

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