Viewpoint: ‘Overhyped, speculative, and fear mongering’ — How biotechnology critics have lobbied to mislead the public on the science of GM crops

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Masked Greenpeace activists hold signs during a demonstration in New Delhi. Credit: Reuters
Masked Greenpeace activists hold signs during a demonstration in New Delhi. Credit: Reuters

Most of the issues raised in available literature against GMOs on the grounds of health and environmental risks, and national food sovereignty concerns are overhyped, speculative and fear-mongering. 

Public interest and safety will be better assured and safeguarded if GMOs proponents and opponents reached consensus on standardization regarding tolerable level of harm and acceptable safety limit in interpreting impact assessment results of GMOs on health and environment.

Follow the latest news and policy debates on agricultural biotech and biomedicine? Subscribe to our newsletter.

Regarding the argument of threat to food sovereignty, many anti-GM activists have vehemently argued against the patents regimes governing GM seeds, describing it as an attempt to control global food production by few corporations with the tendency of creating a situation where resource poor farmers will have to perpetually depend on biotech companies for their seeds. 

But the fact that other conventional bred seeds also have patents and protected by intellectual property rights, takes the argument of patents regime creating corporate control of the global market with consequence on national food sovereignty out of the GM debate. 

Therefore, the debate on whether or not these patents should exist in the first place is outside the scope of the GMO discussion and should be directed towards how best to attract and safeguard the huge investment required in producing successful GM seed.

Read the original post

Outbreak Featured
Infographic: Gene transfer mystery — How 'antifreeze' genes jumped from one species to another without sex

Infographic: Gene transfer mystery — How ‘antifreeze’ genes jumped from one species to another without sex

It isn’t surprising... that herrings and smelts, two groups of fish that commonly roam the northernmost reaches of the Atlantic ...
a bee covered in pollen x

Are GMOs and pesticides threatening bees?

First introduced in 1995, neonicotinoids ...
glp menu logo outlined

Newsletter Subscription

* indicates required
Email Lists
glp menu logo outlined

Get news on human & agricultural genetics and biotechnology delivered to your inbox.