Is borderline personality disorder genetic?

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Credit: Pinkvilla
Credit: Pinkvilla

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a mental health condition characterized by instability in moods, self-image, and behavior. People with BPD may have unstable relationships; intense episodes of anger, anxiety, or depression; and impulsive, even self-harming, actions.

You are more likely to develop BPD if a member of your family has the condition, and your risk increases depending on how closely related you are to the person with BPD. The heritability of BPD (the chance that you will inherit the trait) is estimated to be 46%.

Current research supports the theory that there is a large genetic component to whether a person develops BPD. Two genes—DPYD and PKP4—have been identified as increasing a person’s risk of developing BPD. 

Follow the latest news and policy debates on agricultural biotech and biomedicine? Subscribe to our newsletter.

For example, if your full sibling has BPD, you are 4.7 times more likely to develop it than someone who is unrelated to anyone with BPD. That said, the prevalence of BPD across populations is 1.4% — meaning that you are still more likely to not develop BPD, even though you are at greater risk.

However, first-degree relatives also share environments, which means that these findings do not point solely to genetics. Environmental causes, particularly childhood trauma, abuse, and neglect, also contribute to developing BPD.

Read the original post

Outbreak Featured
Infographic: Growing human embryos — How long should researchers watch human development play out in a dish?

Infographic: Growing human embryos — How long should researchers watch human development play out in a dish?

In May, the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) released new guidelines that relaxed the 14-day rule, taking away ...
Are GMOs and pesticides threatening bees?

Are GMOs and pesticides threatening bees?

First introduced in 1995, neonicotinoids ...
glp menu logo outlined

Newsletter Subscription

* indicates required
Email Lists
glp menu logo outlined

Get news on human & agricultural genetics and biotechnology delivered to your inbox.