Sleepy during the day? The FDA just approved Xywav to treat idiopathic hypersomnia

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Credit: Tom Merton/Caiaimage/Getty Images
Credit: Tom Merton/Caiaimage/Getty Images

People who live with excessive daytime sleepiness may have a new option for treatment, but it’s not without its risks.

Xywav, which is used to help treat the rare sleep disorder known as idiopathic hypersomnia (IH), has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Although rare, IH is a chronic sleep disorder characterized by never feeling like you’ve had enough sleep or by the feeling of an insatiable need for sleep.

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“There are many sleep conditions and mental health disorders that can cause people to feel sleepy during the daytime,” said Sanam Hafeez, PhD, PsyD, a neuropsychologist in New York City and the director of Comprehend the Mind. “Anxiety and depression can cause a person to wake up feeling sluggish and exhausted.”

“Anxiety mentally takes a toll on people as their bodies are constantly on edge. They may not sleep enough during the night due to excessive worrying,” Hafeez told Healthline. “Depression can make your sleep less restful as well, leaving you craving more sleep.”

The World Health Organization (WHO) suggests that the COVID-19 pandemic has increased the occurrence of anxiety, depression, and sleep difficulties.

This is an excerpt. Read the original post here.

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