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Articles written for the GLP list the source as Genetic Literacy Project. All other articles were written for the sources noted with excerpts provided by the GLP.

Why ‘unnatural’ life probably doesn’t deserve the reputation of Frankenstein

National Geographic | 
In the standard Frankenstein story, a scientist creates an unnatural monster that breaks out of the lab and runs amok ...

What if your microbiome turns against you?

National Geographic | 
It’s an ugly fact of life that getting old means getting infections. Old people get attacked more by pathogens, and ...

Study reveals clues as to why the common cold virus is so effective

New York Times | 
If there is a champion among contagions, it may well be the lowly rhinovirus, responsible for many of the coughs ...

Unusual reproduction of nematodes may illuminate sexual evolution in animals

This View Of Life | 
The vinegar worm (officially known as Caenorhabditis elegans) is about as simple as an animal can be. When this soil-dwelling ...

Only birds evolved feathers, but many other species have genes for them, too

National Geographic | 
Feathers are like eyes or hands. They’re so complex, so impressive in their adaptations, so good at getting a job ...

Sometimes, viruses make us healthy

New York Times | 
When we talk about viruses, usually we focus on the suffering caused by Ebola, influenza and the like. But our ...

Evolution explains infanticide among mammals

New York Times | 
In the early 1970s, Sarah Blaffer Hrdy, then a graduate student at Harvard, traveled to India to study Hanuman langurs, ...

Mothers’ breast milk transfers important signals to baby

New York Times | 
Milk is not just food. The more closely scientists examine it, the more complexity they find. Along with nutrients like ...

How evolution gave rise to zombie ladybugs and mind-controlling wasps

National Geographic | 
A predator protected from other predators, the ladybug would seem to have the perfect insect life—were it not for wasps ...

Evolutionary incubators turn invasive species into ecological nightmares

New York Times | 
Invasive species are both a fact of life and a scientific puzzle. Humans transport animals and plants thousands of miles from ...

Central Park home to more wildlife than meets the eye

National Geographic | 
In 2003, an army of 350 scientists and volunteers swept out across Central Park. Their mission, called a BioBlitz, was ...

How very similar genes give rise to diversity of life

National Geographic | 
There’s a unity to life. Sometimes it’s plain to see, but very often it lurks underneath a distraction of differences ...

Video: How do new genes get made?

TedEd | 
When life emerged on Earth about 4 billion years ago, the earliest microbes had a set of basic genes that ...

Are we puppets of our own gut bacteria?

New York Times | 
Your body is home to about 100 trillion bacteria and other microbes, collectively known as your microbiome. Naturalists first became aware ...

Mapping evolutionary history with genes for smell

National Geographic | 
Animals have been smelling for hundreds of millions of years, but the evolution of that sense is difficult to trace ...
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What can our microbiomes tell us about ourselves?

National Geographic | 
Some of my friends are sporting wristbands these days that keep track of their bodies. Little computers nestled in these ...

When individual has multiple genomes, genetic tests get complicated

New York Times | 
When Meriel M. McEntagart, a geneticist at St. George’s University of London, met the family in May 2012, she suspected ...
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Could we end malaria with GE mosquitoes?

New York Times | 
The ability to edit genomes may offer us the ability to build and release mosquitos resistant to malaria, ending the ...

Human blood types remain a mystery despite a hundred years of study

Mosaic Science | 
In 1900 the Austrian physician Karl Landsteiner first discovered blood types, winning the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for ...

Mutation rates may explain why plants can live much longer than animals

National Geographic | 
Scientists can’t offer a simple, straightforward answer to why plants can get so much older than animals. But they have ...

Rapid DNA sequencing saves teenager from fatal bacterial infection

New York Times | 
Joshua Osborn, 14, lay in a coma at American Family Children’s Hospital in Madison, Wis. For weeks his brain had ...

Metabolic changes in human evolution: Hungry brains and frugal muscles

New York Times | 
For decades, scientists have wondered how our metabolism compares to that of other species. It’s been a hard question to ...

Marmosets offer clue to human stillbirths, programmed while mom is in grandma’s womb

National Geographic | 
One way to learn about reproductive health is to observe how our primate cousins have babies. And a new study ...

One man’s junk: What non-coding DNA really means

National Geographic | 
Genomes are like books of life. But until recently, their covers were locked. Finally we can now open the books ...

Antibiotic resistance now major threat to public health

New York Times | 
The Lechuguilla Cave in New Mexico is a network of chambers stretching 1,600 feet underground. The bacteria that grow on ...

Dating the origin of our genes

New York Times | 
Each of us carries just over 20,000 genes that encode everything from the keratin in our hair down to the ...

Mummy geneticist’s memoir

New York Times | 
 In the summer of 1981, a Swedish graduate student named Svante Paabo filled a laboratory at the University of Uppsala ...
GenomePerson

How much of our genome do we share with other organisms? Take this quiz.

National Geographic | 
Find out how much genetic material humans share with grapes, round worms and dogs ...