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How do you live knowing you might have an alzheimer’s gene?

| June 11, 2012
Though as much as 99 percent of all Alzheimer’s cases are not a result of a known genetic mutation, researchers have determined that the best place to find a treatment or cure for the disease is to study those who possess a mutation that causes it. That’s the impetus behind a study, known as DIAN (for Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network) that involves more than 260 people in the United States, Britain and Australia. Since 2008, researchers have been monitoring the brains of subjects who have mutations in any of three genes that cause Alzheimer’s to see how the disease develops before symptoms occur.

The GLP featured this article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion and analysis. The viewpoint is the author’s own. The GLP’s goal is to stimulate constructive discourse on challenging science issues.

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