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Genetically modified apple draws national attention and sparks controversy

Genetically modified apples can’t be found at a grocery store in the United States, but a Canadian company could change that.

Okanagan Specialty Fruits, a company based in British Columbia, has developed a genetically modified apple it claims does not turn brown when cut. The company is trying to get approval from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to market its product to consumers and prompting debate in the U.S. apple industry.

David Bedford, a scientist with the University of Minnesota’s apple breeding program, said he thinks it will take a trait more important than browning to change the views of the apple industry and the American public, which currently do not favor genetically modifying apples.

View the original article here: Genetically modified apple draws national attention and sparks controversy

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