Scientists engineer extreme bacteria to make fuel from carbon dioxide

Pyrococcus
P. furiosus bacterium. Credit: Missouri University of Science and Technology

The following is an edited excerpt.

University of Georgia researchers recently used the mighty Pyrococcus furiosus, which usually eats carbohydrates and lives in super-heated waters or volcanic marine mud. By toying with the genome-sequenced microorganism’s genetic material, they were able to make it eat carbon dioxide. After that, using hydrogen gas to form a chemical reaction in the microorganism, the researchers got the microorganism to produce 3-hydroxypropionic acid, a common chemical used in household products. Now the researchers are looking into turning the process into one that could eventually produce fuel.

Read the full article here: Scientists Engineer Extreme Microorganisms To Make Fuel From Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

 

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