CRISPR can create viable, genetically modified monkeys

Researchers at Nanjing Medical University and Yunnan Key Laboratory of Primate Biomedical Research in Kunming, China, have created genetically modified monkeys using a new method of DNA engineering known as Crispr.

The infant macaques show that targeted genome editing is feasible in primates—a potential boon for scientists studying complex diseases, including neurological ones, and an advance that suggests that the method could one day work in humans.

Scientists have previously used the new genome-editing technique to delete, insert, and modify DNA in human cells and other animal cells grown in petri dishes. The method has also been used to create gene modifications in whole animals. The new study shows for the first time that Crispr can create viable primates with genomes modified at specific targeted genes.

Read the full, original story: Monkeys Modified with Genome Editing

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