FDA asked to approve “three-parent” IVF

| February 21, 2014
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This article or excerpt is included in the GLP’s daily curated selection of ideologically diverse news, opinion and analysis of biotechnology innovation.

In a public meeting scheduled for February 25-26, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will consider approval of experiments to produce children by the in vitro fertilization of an egg containing DNA derived from both the intended mother and another woman.

Although such large-scale genetic engineering has never before been attempted in humans, the procedure — to create “three-parent babies” — is paradoxically being touted by its developers as a relatively trivial tweaking of the reproductive process to enable women with compromised eggs to become genetic mothers of unaffected children. These claims of high impact health benefits from a low-risk procedure cannot be squared with scientific reality.

We do not know nearly enough about the process of embryonic development for the FDA to even contemplate approving this procedure.

Read the full, original story: FDA Asked to Approve Creation of Genetically Modified Children

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The GLP featured this article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion and analysis. The viewpoint is the author’s own. The GLP’s goal is to stimulate constructive discourse on challenging science issues.

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