USDA backs down from proposed GMO disclosure rule

| | July 21, 2014
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The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is backing down from a GMO disclosure rule that would have provided state regulators with critical information about the genetically modified organisms that farmers use to spray their crops.

In February 2013, the USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service proposed sharing information with state regulators about genetically engineered organisms that are released in their jurisdictions. But the USDA withdrew the rule, because it said it found “potential vulnerabilities” that would have put farmers’ businesses at risk.

“We have decided to withdraw the proposed rule to ensure that our ability to protect confidential business information from disclosure is maintained,” the USDA wrote in the Federal Register. Farmers that want to use or import GMOs must register with the USDA and apply for permits. Through this process, the USDA receives information about farmers’ GMO use.

Read the full, original article: USDA withdraws GMO disclosure rule

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