First US uterus transplant fails due to post-surgery complications

| | March 10, 2016
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The woman who received the first uterus transplant performed in the United States suffered a sudden complication that forced surgeons to remove the organ, the Cleveland Clinic announced.

Just two days after she was introduced to much fanfare at a news conference, the 26-year-old woman, named Lindsey, is “doing well and recovering,” the Cleveland Clinic said in a news release.

The transplant, performed Feb. 24, is part of a clinical trial that surgeons hoped would result in uterus transplants for 10 carefully screened recipients. It was unclear whether Lindsey could still be a candidate for another transplant.

The news conference was held about two years after the world’s first uterine transplant was conducted in Sweden. In October 2014, doctors there announced that one of the patients had delivered a healthy boy. Four more children have been born to the women there since.

About one in 5,000 women is born without a uterus, doctors said. For those whose beliefs do not allow surrogacy or who do not want to adopt, uterine transplants offer the possibility of pregnancy and delivery. Lindsey said she and her husband, Blake, have three children whom they adopted through the foster care system.

Read full, original post: First U.S. uterus transplant removed after complication

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