Bangladesh will continue GMO cultivation, pursue improved rice varieties

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The government will continue plans allowing Genetically Modified (GM) crop cultivation, Agriculture Minister Matia Chowdhury told a discussion [Aug. 20] on rice production in Asia and food security in Bangladesh.

. . . .

Earlier conservative, Europe even expressed intent recently to go for GMO, she told the programme organised by Bangladesh Agricultural Journalists and Activists Federation (BAJAF) in AKM Giasuddin Milky Auditorium at Khamarbari.

“They can wait because they have an abundance of land. We do not have land but have a huge population. What else will we have if people die for the absence of food for the stance on pure foods,” said Matia.

“We do not suffer from the aristocratic conservativeness that we will not accept, assimilate new technology by breaking our taboo to increase production,” she added.

. . . .

Matia said people were voicing reluctance despite consuming such crops at present. “Let those who have an abundance of land go for the luxury. We are going with this sort of luxury but we will be careful,” she said.

. . . .

She said the ministry gives emphasis on introducing improved varieties of rice. . . to increase rice production.

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this blog/article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion and analysis. Read full, original post: GM crop cultivation to continue: Matia

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