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How the ‘Millennial Brain’ has evolved to flourish in today’s interconnected world

| | November 11, 2016

While Millennials have been heavily criticized for their obsession with technology, they have been evolving as collaborators, multitaskers and consumers of complex information. In short, they are becoming exactly the kind of employees and eventually a future leaders that an organization can leverage in today’s interconnected world.

Social sharing lights up a part of the brain called the temporoparietal junction which stimulates the production of oxytocin, “the feel-good hormone.”  Millennials, more than any other generation, have

Judith Glaser, Organizational Anthropologist
Judith Glaser, Organizational Anthropologist

grown up interacting online and…have learned that…conversations driven by technology can give them an even higher oxytocin boost than interacting in person.

The popular press…has suggested that humans can’t actually multi-task…[However, a scientific report states:] “Younger brains are most stimulated (better attention capture, engagement, and memorability) with elements of dynamism…[and] also have high multi-sensory processing capacity….”

Interpreting the data, we believe that Millennials seem to be better at fielding higher levels of information than their elders and are therefore able to process, integrate and act on data more quickly and to ignore distractions when necessary.

Millennials have evolved and developed through this exponentially expanding digital world. Instead of trying to fit Millennials into other generational molds, we need to celebrate and apply their strengths.

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this blog/article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Read full, original post: Science Explains the Millennial Brain

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Click the link above to read the full, original article.
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