Anti-GMO activist-funded lab tests find micro-traces of glyphosate in popular foods

| | November 16, 2016

The herbicide residues were found in cookies, crackers, popular cold cereals and chips commonly consumed by children and adults, according to Food Democracy Now and the group’s “Detox Project,” which arranged for the testing at the San Francisco-based Anresco lab. … The groups issued a report [Nov. 14] that details the findings.

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The tests conducted by Anresco were done on 29 foods commonly found on grocery store shelves. Glyphosate residues were found in General Mills’ Cheerios at 1,125.3 parts per billion (ppb), in Kashi soft-baked oatmeal dark chocolate cookies at 275.57 ppb, and in Ritz Crackers at 270.24 ppb, according to the report. Different levels were found in Kellogg’s Special K cereal, Triscuit Crackers and several other products. The report noted that for some of the findings, the amounts were “rough estimates at best and may not represent an accurate representation of the sample.” The food companies did not respond to a request for comment.

Related article:  GMOs and herbicide resistant weeds stumbling blocks to sustainable farming

The groups said that the federal government should conduct an investigation into the “harmful effects of glyphosate on human health and the environment,” and the relationships between regulators and the agrichemical industry that has long touted the safety of glyphosate.

Read full, original post: Tests Show Monsanto Weed Killer in Cheerios, Other Popular Foods

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Click the link above to read the full, original article.

7 thoughts on “Anti-GMO activist-funded lab tests find micro-traces of glyphosate in popular foods”

  1. How is it that they found glyphosate in oat products. Oats are not glyphosate resistant. If oats are treated with it, they will die, leaving no none to make the Cheerios.

  2. Yes, trace levels of pesticides and herbicides are found in foods. That’s not really news, it seems to me. The good news is that most of the chemicals being used are much less toxic to non-target species than they used to be, and don’t accumulate in the environment.

  3. Regarding the statement that ” the federal government should conduct an investigation into the “harmful effects of glyphosate on human health and the environment,” it should be noted that glyphosate is currently under re-review by the US EPA. See: https://www.epa.gov/ingredients-used-pesticide-products/glyphosate. The cancer review has already been completed, with EPA concluding that glyphosate is “‘not likely to be carcinogenic to humans’ at doses relevant to human health risk assessment.” Release of the full review is currently projected for spring 2017.

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