China’s resistance to reform biotech import approval process irks trade partners

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An annual U.S.-China trade conference ended [Nov. 23] with little headway in getting China to reform the way it approves new agricultural biotechnology traits, U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman said.

. . . .

China’s acceptance of new varieties of genetically modified corn, soybeans and other commodities is vitally important to the U.S. agriculture sector that depends on exports to the Asian giant, Froman said.

The U.S. has been pressing China for years to ditch its asynchronous approach to approving new genetically modified traits, but has had little success. China is the only major importing country that still refuses to begin its biotech approval process until after the U.S. or another country first completes the approval process…

Furthermore, China has become less reliable and more secretive about its approval process…

. . . .

…Froman stressed that the U.S. “has long sought that China have a transparent, timely and science-based regulatory system for the review and approval of products derived from agricultural biotechnology. We have had many discussions on these topics, but we still have unnecessary trade disruptions, because of the asynchronous approval process. This not only hurts U.S. farmers, but it hurts China’s livestock industry and China’s own innovation industry.”

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this blog/article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion and analysis. Read full, original post: Froman ‘disappointed’ as China resists reforms in biotech approval process

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