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New, more efficient method for using CRISPR to genetically edit flowering plants

| December 7, 2016

A pair of plant biologists at the Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (ITbM) of Nagoya University, has reported in the journal Plant and Cell Physiology, on the development of a new vector (a carrier to transfer genetic information) to knockout the target genes in the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, in a highly efficient and inheritable manner.

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So far, the CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) system is one of the most popular methods for genetic manipulation arising from its simplicity, versatility and efficiency.

 

[T]he mutation inducing efficiency of CRISPR/Cas9 towards the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, has remained somewhat low so far. … Therefore, a significant amount of time, effort and plant species has been required to obtain the desired plant species with the targeted gene knocked out.

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“By being able to efficiently knockout the targeted gene in Arabidopsis thaliana, we consider this to be a promising method to elucidate the genetic functions of plants,” says Tetsuya Higashiyama, a professor and leader of this research. “We hope that we can apply this methodology for genome editing of crops, such as Brassica napus, to accelerate their growth and generate a variety of plant lines.”

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this blog/article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion and analysis. Read full, original post: Highly efficient genome engineering in flowering plants

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Click the link above to read the full, original article.
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