LA Times: Food Evolution GMO movie persuasive not polemical, ‘potentially revolutionary’

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Calm, careful, potentially revolutionary, “Food Evolution” is an iconoclastic documentary on a hot-button topic. Persuasive rather than polemical, it’s the unusual issue film that deals in counterintuitive reason rather than barely controlled hysteria.

As directed by Scott Hamilton Kennedy, “Food Evolution” wades into the controversy that makes the term GMO (genetically modified organisms) what Jon Stewart once called “the three most terrifying letters in the English language.”

“Food Evolution” takes time to carefully parse several issues that arise in the debate, like tumors in rats who eat GMO food (they get tumors no matter what they eat) and poundage versus toxicity in pesticide use.

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The film also emphasizes that decisions made in the developed world can have global implications, exploring difficulties farmers in Uganda are having gaining access to the GMO bananas they want to combat decimation by disease.

Related article:  What foods have pesticide residues? When do the chemical traces pose dangers?

[T]he film is more troubled by the erosion of trust in science and by anti-GMO activists like Zen Honeycutt who says on camera that she trusts personal experiences of mothers more than the conclusions of scientists. As writer Lynas says, “If you throw science out, there is nothing.”

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this blog/article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Read full, original post: Documentary ‘Food Evolution’ turns to reason to discuss GMO controversy

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