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New rice variety that grows in salty water could feed millions in China

| | November 1, 2017

Scientists in China have developed several types of rice that can be grown in seawater, potentially creating enough food for 200 million people.

Researchers have been trying to grow the grain in salty water for decades but have only now developed varieties that could be commercially viable.

The rice was grown in a field near the Yellow Sea coastal city of Qingdao in China’s eastern Shandong province. 200 different types of the grain were planted to investigate which would grow best in salty conditions.

The scientists expected to produce 4.5 tonnes of rice per hectare but the crops exceeded expectations, in one case delivering up to 9.3 tonnes per hectare.

There are one million square kilometres of land in China where crops do not grow because of high salinity. Scientists hope the development of the new rice will allow some of these areas to be used for agriculture.

If even a tenth of these areas were planted with rice, they could produce 50 million tonnes of food – enough to feed 200 million people and boost China’s rice production by 20 percent.

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion and analysis. Read full, original post: Chinese scientists develop rice that can grow in seawater, potentially creating enough food for 200 million people

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Click the link above to read the full, original article.
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