Blundering through the food label controversy: How one poultry company exploits consumer fears over ‘natural’ and GMOs

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Credit: Chicken Check In

I live in a super tiny town, about 1,000 people with no stoplight in the whole county…Therefore, it may sound silly to the average city person, but I usually buy chicken breast at the gas station.

But I may have to start buying that grocery off brand since the kind carried at the gas station recently switched their labeling, marketing, and packaging to bombard consumers with misleading claims that I just can’t support and won’t purchase.

1: Non-GMO. GMO or GE grains allow farmers to be more sustainable by growing more crop on less land while using less pesticides, tillage, etc. Furthermore, everything we eat has been modified in some way, so the term “GMO” is somewhat scientifically meaningless. GMOs do great things for farmers and the planet though, so this is just a marketing ploy used to mislead and sell a product which is generally worse for the earth.

2: Raised with no antibiotics ever. OK, that’s admirable and commonplace nowadays. However, antibiotics can play a very important role in animal health and shouldn’t really be demonized. Would you withhold medicine from a sick pet or child? No, and we shouldn’t be cruel to livestock either.

Anyway, it’s a shame that I will no longer by this brand of chicken, because I do think it’s tasty. If only they focused on quality, price, flavor, etc. as opposed to inflammatory language.

Read full, original article: Farm Babe: Poultry company loses a customer because of these labels

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