Viewpoint: Anti-GMO Organic Consumers Association helps Russia spread dangerous myths raising fake concerns about vaccines and biotechnology

Russian trolls are meddling wherever and whenever they can to cause societal strife. Radio Free Europe reports that Russian trolls may have contributed to the massive measles outbreak in Europe in 2018, which sickened 82,000 people and killed 72, by spreading anti-vaccine propaganda.

This is consistent with stories that were reported a few months earlier, which concluded that Russian trolls were promoting pro- and anti-vaccine campaigns. Why both? Because their mission is to sow discord, chaos, and confusion. This strategy even has a name: The Gerasimov Doctrine. It’s why the promotion of all sorts of conspiracy theories (including anti-GMO propaganda) on social media can often be traced back to Russia.

organic consumers conspiracy

The Organic Consumers Association is funded by the organic [food] industry, which is built upon a foundation of lies. Evidence shows that organic food isn’t healthier for people and that organic farming isn’t better for the environment. (Actually, it’s worse for the environment.)….Given its shaky relationship with reality, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that the Organic Consumers Association peddles other bizarre ideas….

Related article:  Even non-GMO foods contain genes? America's confusion over what we eat

 

So, both Russian trolls and the Organic Consumers Association push conspiracy theories, including anti-vaccine propaganda. But the similarities don’t end there. The OCA actively colludes with the Russian propaganda machine.

Ronnie Cummins, who heads the OCA, appeared on the propaganda outlet RT (formerly known as Russia Today) to spread misinformation about American agriculture.

Read full, original article: How Organic Consumers Association Colludes With Russian Trolls

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Click the link above to read the full, original article.
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