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Low trust in government tech regulation fuels consumer doubt about GMOs, gene editing

Trust in governance is at an all-time low. Experts trace a first major decline in trust back to the 1970s, corresponding with rising worries about what is today referred to as the Great Acceleration. More recently, global incidents like the financial crisis have continued to erode trust in governments and institutions.

The trend of declining trust is exemplified and amplified in the context of technology governance. Consider gene editing, self-driving cars, or data security and data protection by the large social media players. Besides the technologies themselves, it is the rules, procedures, market access requirements and regulatory institutions – in other words, the governance of these technologies – that is perceived to have already failed ….

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Some innovations and technologies of the Fourth Industrial Revolution – smartphones, for example – receive a near unanimous positive reception. Others – such as genetically modified organisms (GMO) – face hostility, even rejection. In both cases, the role of governance goes beyond ensuring human health and environmental sustainability. “Whether or not I like the technology, I know I can trust those in government who are in charge of deciding over its safe use and application” is what governance strives to achieve.

Read full, original article: 3 ways to rebuild trust in how we regulate technology

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Click the link above to read the full, original article.
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