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Soot in the womb: Research suggests air pollution threatens developing babies

| | September 24, 2019

The GLP posts this article or excerpt as part of a daily curated selection of biotechnology-related news, opinion and analysis.

Breathing in polluted air may send soot far beyond a pregnant woman’s lungs, all the way to the womb surrounding her developing baby.

Samples of placenta collected after women in Belgium gave birth revealed soot, or black carbon, embedded within the tissue on the side that faces the baby, researchers report online September 17 in Nature Communications. The amount of black carbon in the placenta correlated with a woman’s air pollution exposure, estimated based on emissions of black carbon near her home.

“There’s no doubt that air pollution harms a developing baby,” says Amy Kalkbrenner, an environmental epidemiologist at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee who was not involved in the new work. Mothers who encounter air pollution regularly may have babies born prematurely or with low birth weight (SN: 5/13/15).

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These developmental problems have been tied to an inflammatory response to air pollution in a mother’s body, including inflammation within the uterus. But the new study, Kalkbrenner says, suggests that “air pollution itself is getting into the developing baby.”

“The black carbon particles truly stand out uniquely” from the rest of the tissue, says [biomedical physicist] Bryan Spring.

Read full, original post: Air pollution can reach the placenta around a developing baby

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