CRISPR got an upgrade. ‘Prime editing’ offers more accurate ‘search-and-replace’

crispr prime
Image: MS Tech

All right, let’s do this one last time. My name is CRISPR. I was made from a bacterial defense system, and for years I’ve been the one and only gene editing wunderkind.

Dr. David Liu at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard in Cambridge, MA, introduced an upgrade that in theory may correct nearly 90 percent of all disease-causing genetic variations. Rather than simply deactivating a gene, CRISPR-based “prime editing” is a true search-and-replace editor for the human genome. With a single version, it can change individual DNA letters, delete letters, or insert blocks of new letters into the genome, with minimal damage to the DNA strand.

Related article:  CRISPR, disease-sensing technologies could yield a 'cornucopia' of healthier, tastier foods

For now, prime editing has only been tested in cultured cells. But its efficacy is off the charts. Early experiments found it could correct single-letter misspellings in sickle cell disease, snip out four superfluous letters that underlie Tay-Sachs, and insert three missing letters to correct a genomic typo that leads to cystic fibrosis.

“The excitement has been palpable,” said Dr. Fyodor Urnov at the University of California, Berkeley, who was not involved in the research. “I can’t overstate the significance of this.”

Read full, original post: Everything You Need to Know About Superstar CRISPR Prime Editing

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