Genetic engineering could tackle crop growth barriers that promote hunger in developing nations

Potato farms

Using potatoes and cassava plants, along with other species such as tomato, rice, and cotton as models, [researchers have] identified a suite of genes and proteins that limit a leaf’s ability to efficiently use solar energy to make assimilates (mainly sucrose), and the translocation to and use of the assimilates within sink organs, such as seeds, fruits, and roots.

In identifying these bottlenecks, [the] team also discovered the signaling molecules and regulatory genes that trigger or initiate the growth of sink organ – what determines how many seeds, flowers, or fruit a plant might grow.

Professor Yong-Ling Ruan from the University of Newcastle] said that as agriculture faced a massive increase in demand from a booming population and environmental deterioration, it was essential to understand the biological processes that regulate resource and energy distribution in the plant body, thereby allowing the identification of key gene targets for genetic engineering and breeding.

ADVERTISEMENT

Read the original post

Related article:  Scientists engineer chickens to make cancer drugs—10 times cheaper to produce than factory-made medicines
Outbreak Daily Digest
Biotech Facts & Fallacies
Genetics Unzipped
Infographic: Deaths from COVID-19 are far higher than reported estimates

Infographic: Deaths from COVID-19 are far higher than reported estimates

More than 2.8 million people have lost their lives due to the pandemic, according to a Wall Street Journal analysis ...
seralinistud

Gilles-Éric Séralini: Activist professor and face of anti-GMO industry

The French biologist and his research team--funded by the Rodale ...
vandana shiva

Vandana Shiva: ‘Rock Star’ of GMO protest movement has anti-science history

In a 2012 interview, Bill Moyers referred to Vandana Shiva as ...
News on human & agricultural genetics and biotechnology delivered to your inbox.
glp menu logo outlined

Newsletter Subscription

Optional. Mail on special occasions.
Send this to a friend