Lab-grown…kibble? How cultured meat might sustainably feed our cats and dogs

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Credit: Natural Select Pet Food

The alternative meat movement is growing and quite literally for some companies. Companies like Bond see lab-grown meat as a sustainable and nutritious resource of the future …. but Bond isn’t growing your next hamburger in their labs, they’re focusing on food for your pets!

Bond is crafting animal-free chicken protein treats and kibble to make your pet’s diet more sustainable without sacrificing nutrition. While switching to an entirely plant-based diet is a feasible option for humans, Bond CEO Rich Kelleman points out that many plant-based options pose nutritional challenges for cats and dogs.

Fortunately, while humans are looking for alternative meats that taste, smell, and feel like the “real deal,” pets are generally less picky. For this reason, Bond is focusing on the protein and nutrient levels of the grown meats, rather than the experience. As long as it tastes good, most animals will eat it up.

Related article:  Why local food production doesn't prevent shortages in a pandemic

The company uses microbial fermentation to produce chicken protein. The process is derived from a blood sample from an actual chicken to produce a product that looks somewhat like diced poultry. This can then be dried and used as a protein base in treats and food.

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