Viewpoint: Politics — not science — driving Canadian policy decisions over glyphosate and other agricultural tools

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Credit: Civil Eats
Credit: Civil Eats

Ahead of a federal election call, three [Canadian] federal ministers called a halt to a process that would likely have yielded quick results on increasing the maximum residue limits for glyphosate applied to dry beans, lentils and peas.

Regular reviews of the scientific data for safe levels of pesticides on food products and in the environment take place to ensure the rules are in keeping with the science of the day and in harmony with our trading partners and other larger economies around the world. This ensures Canada operates within international trade standards.

Normally, politicians don’t intervene in scientific reviews. But when three ministers put a pause on the regular review process for a controversial, but scientifically-proven-safe chemistry at the same time an election is called, it appears self-serving.

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Many urban voters have a negative impression of glyphosate, the most popular brand being Roundup, due to frivolous (even if successful) lawsuits in the United States, and pressure from the so-called environmental-defence crowd. And it appears the federal Liberals might be counting on avoiding another issue that could shift some votes to the New Democratic Party, or even the Greens, during the Sept. 20 election.

This is an excerpt. Read the original post here.

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