Gene therapy restores sense of smell in mice, may aid research into other diseases

Scientists have restored the sense of smell in mice through gene therapy for the first time—a hopeful sign for people who can’t smell anything from birth or lose it due to disease.

The achievement in curing congenital anosmia—the medical term for lifelong inability to detect odors—may also aid research on other conditions that also stem from problems with the cilia. Those tiny hair-shaped structures on the surfaces of cells throughout the body are involved in many diseases, from the kidneys to the eyes. The new findings, published online in Nature Medicine, come from a team at the University of Michigan Medical School and their colleagues at several other institutions.

View the original article here: Gene therapy restores sense of smell, may aid research into other diseases … – Medical Xpress

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