Engineered mosquitoes stymie malaria’s spread with bacteria

The following is an excerpt. Find a link to the full story below.

Scientists have engineered mosquitoes to carry a bacterium that confers resistance to the malaria parasite — a long-sought advance that could eventually curb malaria cases in humans.

A team led by Zhiyong Xi, a medical entomologist at Michigan State University in East Lansing, infected Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes withWolbachia bacteria to produce insects that could pass the infection on to their offspring. Female mosquitoes that carried Wolbachia also bred with uninfected mates, the researchers report today inScience, swiftly spreading the malaria-blocking bacterium to entire insect populations within eight generations.

Read the full story here: Sickly mosquitoes stymie malaria’s spread

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