We’re on the cusp of whole genome sequencing at birth

Professor Matt Brown, Director of the Diamantina Institute at the University of Queensland, predicts that whole genome sequencing at birth is about a decade away from becoming a part of routine screening in our hospitals.

A human genome comprises 3.3 billion bases and about 22,000 genes, and on average each person carries about 50 or 60 new mutations. Add to this a variation of 100 or 200 bases between each of us and deciphering whole genome sequences starts sounding complicated.

But gene sequencing is a success story and it’s getting faster and cheaper each year.

Read the full, original story here: Generation genome

ADVERTISEMENT
Outbreak Daily Digest
Biotech Facts & Fallacies
GLP Podcasts
Infographic: Deaths from COVID-19 are far higher than reported estimates

Infographic: Deaths from COVID-19 are far higher than reported estimates

More than 2.8 million people have lost their lives due to the pandemic, according to a Wall Street Journal analysis ...
News on human & agricultural genetics and biotechnology delivered to your inbox.
glp menu logo outlined

Newsletter Subscription

Optional. Mail on special occasions.
Send this to a friend