Multitasking skill may be genetic

Human factors/ergonomics researchers have long studied the connection between cognitive function and the ability to perform well on multiple simultaneous tasks, and recently a group of neuroergonomics researchers went a step further to examine a genetic link to multitasking ability. Neuroergonomics is the study of the brain in relation to performance.

In their Human Factors paper, “Interactive Effects of the COMT Gene and Training on Individual Differences in Supervisory Control of Unmanned Vehicles,” Parasuraman and colleagues hypothesized that individuals with the Met/Met genotype of the Val158Met variant of the Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) gene would perform better in a simulated air-defense task than would people without that genotype.

Read the full, original story: Is Multitasking Mastery in the Genes?

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