GMOs have health benefits not health risks

| | April 7, 2015

GM apples and potatoes were recently approved in the U.S. and Canada, but with some pushback from companies due to consumer demand. There are some legitimate concerns around the business/legal realm of GM crops, but in terms of human safety and nutrition, the consensus is in and GM crops are safe.

Any concerns about the actual methods of genetic modification are highly unwarranted. Any plant or animal product is full of DNA that our body readily digests, messing with one or two genes isn’t going to impact human health. The only way GM food could affect human health is if the modification somehow produce a protein product that was actively toxic to humans. Say what you want about corporate greed, but a big biotech company would never do that because that would cost them a lot of money in the lawsuits down the road.

In an attempt to counteract negative press, a new generation of GM crops is attempting to build in health benefits, as reported on Phys.org. The US has already approved the import of genetically engineered pink pineapples that contain the tomato-based pigment lycopene, which is a antioxidant that might help prevent cancer. Similarly, the purple pigment/antioxidant from blueberries is being engineered into tomatoes.

Other groups are also attempting to enhance the primary nutrition of foods, and not just trace compounds. Proteins, minerals, vitamins precursors, all factors that could help alleviate malnutrition in developing countries.

Read full, original article: Is Genetically Modified Food Safe?

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Click the link above to read the full, original article.

 

News on human & agricultural genetics and biotechnology delivered to your inbox.

Send this to a friend