Genes of Harambe, gorilla shot at Cincinnati Zoo, stored for research

Harambe

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this blog/article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion and analysis.

After shooting dead a gorilla at the Cincinnati Zoo to save a 3-year-old boy, zoo officials said they had collected a sample of his sperm, raising hopes among distraught fans that Harambe could sire offspring even in death.

But officials at the main U.S. body that oversees breeding of zoo animals said it was highly unlikely that the Western lowland gorilla’s contribution to the nation’s “frozen zoo” of genetic material of rare and endangered species would be used to breed.

“Currently, it’s not anything we would use for reproduction,” Kristen Lukas, who heads the Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ Gorilla Species Survival Plan, said. “It will be banked and just stored for future use or for research studies.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Harambe’s sperm will likely go into a collection of samples taken from gorillas and other animals that are preserved in liquid nitrogen and typically viable for hundreds of years, said the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians Director Robert Hilsenroth.

Read full, original post: Genes of slain Cincinnati gorilla to live on

Outbreak Daily Digest
Biotech Facts & Fallacies
GLP Podcasts
Infographic: Deaths from COVID-19 are far higher than reported estimates

Infographic: Deaths from COVID-19 are far higher than reported estimates

More than 2.8 million people have lost their lives due to the pandemic, according to a Wall Street Journal analysis ...
News on human & agricultural genetics and biotechnology delivered to your inbox.
glp menu logo outlined

Newsletter Subscription

Optional. Mail on special occasions.
Send this to a friend