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Soybeans resistant to herbicide dicamba will improve weed control but may not meet expectations

| | February 13, 2017

This article or excerpt is included in the GLP’s daily curated selection of ideologically diverse news, opinion and analysis of biotechnology innovation.

A barrier to weed control on soybean farms has been lifted after the [EPA] approved a label allowing use of the herbicide dicamba in dicamba-resistant soybean, although only one commercial product received that label.

Many Illinois farmers anticipate this technology will provide a much-needed method to control weeds that are resistant to multiple herbicides, as well as other difficult-to-control species.

“Without question, there are instances and scenarios in which dicamba will improve control of certain weed species, but dicamba will not bring back the ‘good ol’ days’ of post-only weed control programs in soybean. Current expectations of what this technology can accomplish tend to be a bit more optimistic than what the technology actually will be able to deliver,” said University of Illinois weed scientist Aaron Hager.

Related article:  European Commission seeks 5 to 7 year renewal of glyphosate herbicide—down from 10

Hager expects the technology will work well in a handful of scenarios. For example, dicamba should be effective for glyphosate-resistant horseweed (i.e., marestail) that does not respond to the traditional burn-down tank mix of glyphosate and 2,4-D.

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this blog/article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Read full, original post: Dicamba and soybean: What to expect in 2017

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