Organic water? Asarasi exploits loophole to get USDA-certified label on bottles

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Much like asparagus water and water sommeliers, organic water is giving us pause. Though the concept isn’t new, it’s surprising to see it making waves again.

Mintel, a global market research firm, claims that nearly 25 percent of Americans are thirsty for organic water, which proves America doesn’t understand the concept of “organic.”

As NPR first pointed out when organic water hit the scene a few years ago, something can only be considered an organic compound if it contains a significant amount of carbon. But a water molecule contains two atoms of hydrogen (H) and one atom of oxygen (O) ― and no carbon ― so it’s actually inorganic. And according to the USDA’s labeling process for organic products, water and salt are not included as an ingredient that must be labeled organic.

But a trendy new company called Asarasi is taking advantage of a loophole. The brand is selling the first USDA organic-certified water, according to a report from Food Navigator.

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Because Asarasi’s water is filtered through a living thing ― a maple tree ― it appears to pass the USDA’s certification test.

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this blog/article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Read full, original post: Organic Water Is A Sign That Americans Have No Idea What ‘Organic’ Is

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