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Viewpoint: Are you being duped? Some direct-to-consumer genetic tests are ‘complete trash’

| | June 5, 2018

[H]ow accurate are [direct-to-consumer] genetic tests?  The truth is that testing runs the gamut of quality, ranging from medical-grade accuracy to total garbage. So how should you choose?

First, ask yourself what you are looking for in a DTC test:  do you want medical information that can guide your management? Or simply recreational ancestry and ‘genutainment’? Are you willing to pay $70 or $1000 for that kit, or somewhere in between?

If you are looking for general health information and you are willing to spend ~$1000, you can get a full genome sequence from several companies, including Full Genomes or Veritas.

If you are looking for ancestry and/or recreational genetics, Ancestry.com (~$69) and 23andMe ($99 ancestry, $199 health + ancestry) are two popular options.  Be sure to consider the pros and cons before ordering a kit.

Related article:  Muscular dystrophy targeted with promising gene therapy

And then comes the dark side: Companies that have recently issued human reports on dog DNA or, even more worrisome, issued a full genetic report on a tap water sample.  That’s right, tap water.  The take away here:  some DTC genetic tests are fraudulent, and consumers are being duped.

[I]t is important for consumers to know that their DTC test may yield good information, limited information, or complete trash.

Editor’s note: Ellen Matloff is a certified genetic counselor and president and CEO of My Gene Counsel

Read full, original post: How Accurate Is Direct-To-Consumer Genetic Testing? From Gold(ish) To Garbage

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Click the link above to read the full, original article.
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