FDA approves sugar made from Brazil’s first Bt insect resistant sugarcane variety

sugarcane
Credit: Business Today

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has concluded that it is safe to consume sugar produced from the genetically modified sugar cane developed by the Sugarcane Technology Center (CTC) [in Brazil], according to a company statement.

“Based on the information and documents presented, the FDA concluded that both raw and refined sugar produced from Brazil’s first genetically modified variety are as safe for consumption as from conventional varieties,” the CTC said, noting that the US agency’s approval will influence regulators around the world.

The Bt gene used in the variety has at least 20 years of safe use in global agriculture, especially in crops such as soybeans, corn and cotton.

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“Recognition by the FDA is a source of pride for us all because it is one of the most relevant and critical regulatory agencies in the international arena,” said CTC Corporate Affairs Director Viler Janeiro.

Related article:  Viewpoint: Political 'horse-trading' at U.N. threatens sensible GMO, gene editing crop regulation

The approved Bt cane has already been planted on 400 hectares for about 100 mills in Brazil, but won’t be milled in the current season. The mills will first work on multiplying this variety while awaiting approval from other sugar importers.

Editor’s note: This article was originally published in Portuguese. This English summary has been prepared with Google Translate and edited for clarity.

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Read full, original article: EUA concluem que açúcar de cana transgênica brasileira é seguro para consumo

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