Meat industry may back its cell-based competitors to gain foothold in health food market

, | | November 30, 2018

According to Andrew Noyes, the head of communications for Just Inc., meat companies are discussing the possibility of helping cell-based meat producers with distribution and providing production facilities. Noyes’s San Francisco-based company already produces plant-based versions of foods such as mayonnaise, eggs and dressings, but is readying to sell its cultured meat — an area that’s only now preparing to open up to commercial sales.

A partnership between traditional meat companies and their would-be cell-based competitors would make sense: Consumers are buying increasingly larger quantities of products that are seen as more humane and environmentally friendly. Traditional meat producers could use a foothold in this fast-growing niche, while cell-based meat startups could use some assistance in ramping up operations.

Related article:  With lab-grown meat coming to our plates, will we be eating animals in 50 years?

Just Inc. is not the only example of a potentially disruptive startup getting help from established players. Perfect Day Inc., which is developing an animal-free whey, recently said it is going to use Archer-Daniels-Midland Co.’s facilities to scale up production, co-founder Ryan Pandya said.

“No one knows more about how to mass produce meat than the meat-industry companies,” said Bruce Friedrich, executive director of the Good Food Institute, which lobbies for the industry that includes cultured-meat companies like Just Inc., Memphis Meats Inc. and Future Meat Technologies Ltd.

Read full, original article: Lab-Meat Growers Wants Help From Industry They Seek to Disrupt

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Click the link above to read the full, original article.
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