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Cancer death rate in the US has dropped 27% over 25 years

| | January 11, 2019

The rate of people dying from cancer in the United States seems to have dropped steadily for 25 years, a new study says, but disparities remain between the rich and the poor.

The overall nationwide cancer death rate fell continuously from 1991 to 2016 by a total of 27%, according to a study by the American Cancer Society, published … in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

That translates to about 2.6 million fewer cancer deaths total than would have been expected if death rates stayed at their peak, which was seen in 1991, according to the study.

According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, based on the latest data, the three leading causes of death in the United States in 2017 were heart disease, cancer and accidents or unintentional injuries.

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The American Cancer Society study was based on cancer incidence, mortality and survival data in the United States from sources including the National Center for Health Statistics; the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Rules Program; the National Program of Cancer Registries; and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries.

The data showed that the nationwide cancer death rate climbed during most of the 20th century, largely driven by jumps in lung cancer deaths due to smoking and tobacco use.

Read full, original post: US cancer death rate hits 25 years of decline, study says

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