Rethinking evolution: Animals’ attraction to beauty may have nothing to do with survival

1-15-2019 aeb b d k e x
Peacock spider. Image credit: Jurgen Otto/Flickr

Numerous species have conspicuous, metabolically costly and physically burdensome sexual ornaments, as biologists call them. Think of the bright elastic throats of anole lizards, the Fabergé abdomens of peacock spiders and the curling, iridescent, ludicrously long feathers of birds-of-paradise. To reconcile such splendor with a utilitarian view of evolution, biologists have favored the idea that beauty in the animal kingdom is not mere decoration — it’s a code. According to this theory, ornaments evolved as indicators of a potential mate’s advantageous qualities: its overall health, intelligence and survival skills.

[However,] Darwin did not think it was necessary to link aesthetics and survival.

Now, nearly 150 years later, a new generation of biologists is reviving Darwin’s neglected brainchild. Beauty, they say, does not have to be a proxy for health or advantageous genes. Sometimes beauty is the glorious but meaningless flowering of arbitrary preference. Animals simply find certain features — a blush of red, a feathered flourish — to be appealing. And that innate sense of beauty itself can become an engine of evolution, pushing animals toward aesthetic extremes. In other cases, certain environmental or physiological constraints steer an animal toward an aesthetic preference that has nothing to do with survival whatsoever.

Related article:  Defining life: If it's created in a lab, is it really alive?

These biologists are not only rewriting the standard explanation for how beauty evolves; they are also changing the way we think about evolution itself.

Read full, original post: How Beauty Is Making Scientists Rethink Evolution

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