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Pesticide-carrying bees help cut synthetic chemical use on farms

| | September 17, 2019
zmiprus
This article or excerpt is included in the GLP’s daily curated selection of ideologically diverse news, opinion and analysis of biotechnology innovation.

Bees are great at retrieving tiny cargo: their main job is to visit flowering plants in order to gather pollen and nectar for their hive. Now one pesticide company has gained federal permission to ensure they’re bringing something special along on each trip. The Canadian-based company Bee Vectoring Technologies just received EPA approval for an organic fungicide that bees can carry directly from hive to crop. The breakthrough could help farmers eliminate the need for chemical spraying.

It’s called Vectorite, a white powder that farmers place in special trays for honeybees or bumblebees to pass through as they exit their hive. Vectorite carries a refined form of Clonostachys rosea, a fungus that feeds on other types of fungi that damage crops.

Related article:  Paris bans synthetic pesticides as French anti-chemical movement 'gains momentum'

Read full, original article: There’s a new group of workers spreading organic pesticide on crops: bees

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