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Viewpoint: We aren’t ready for biomarkers that could predict how long we’ll live

, | | October 7, 2019

Over the past several years, scientists have identified four genetic and molecular biomarkers that potentially predict human and animal longevity. The first is the rate at which an individual’s telomeres shorten in length. There is increasing evidence from both human and animal studies that the slower the rate of telomere shortening, the longer that individual is likely to live. The second is the rate of gene methylation, indicating an increased level of methylation was correlated with shortened longevity.  The third is the polygenic risk

The fourth approach was described in a study this year that identified 14 blood-based biomarkers of metabolism that when combined into a predictive score was statistically associated with predicting the end of life.

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Several companies are already offering consumers tests to assay their telomere length.

In conclusion, we have not reached the point when it is ethical and scientifically valid to use biomarkers to predict longevity. Assessing molecular or biochemical outcomes that accurately predict longevity will best be applied when we have defined preventive measures or treatments to accompany the predictors that together are likely to improve longevity.

Read full, original post: Opinion: Biomarkers of Longevity Not Ready for the Clinic

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Click the link above to read the full, original article.
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