Genetic role in nicotine addiction and cessation

As everyone knows, smoking kills. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), smoking can lead to cancer, heart disease, lung disease and stroke. Armed with this understanding of the deadly effects of smoking, scientists have increasingly looked into the habit itself and how individuals can be successful in smoking cessation programs.

Researchers from McGill University in Canada recently looked at how genetics can influence individuals’ addictions, specifically how genes can help predict the brain’s response to smoking.

Previous research has shown that people who have strong reactions to smoking cues, including the sight of cigarettes and smokers, are less likely to be able to kick the habit themselves. In general, such smoking cues are related to cigarette use and relapse in dropping the habit.

The current study, conducted by the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (a.k.a. The Neuro) at McGill University, demonstrated that individuals whose genes can metabolize nicotine quickly can respond more adeptly to smoking cues than those who have slower nicotine metabolism.

View the original article here: Genetic role in nicotine addiction and cessation

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