Safety of induced stem cells gets a boost

px Human embryonic stem cells only A
Human embryonic stem cells, via Wikimedia Commons.

Induced pluripotent stem cells offer a way to treat genetic diseases while avoiding the ethical questions surrounding human embryonic stem cells. But a 2011 study raised concerns about the side effects of iPS cells, finding that they induced immune responses in the mice from which they were derived. A new study rejects those findings. “Based on what we know at this time from mice,” says the study’s author, “iPS cells are as good as ES cells, and should be as safe.”

View the original article here: Safety of induced stem cells gets a boost

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