Wary development NGOs should reconsider biotechnology

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Image: Flickr/ Canadian Veggie

The following is an excerpt.

Recognising common ground is the first step towards concrete ways of enhancing the work of both scientists and development practitioners.

The world of science, technology and engineering might seem, for good reason, miles away from the day-to-day work of most development NGOs. But if you get past the jargon or the traditional lab-coat image and look a little closer, there is more common ground than first meets the eye.

By articulating those connections, and strengthening them, the natural sciences and development practice can make the best of what each can offer, and reinforce their collective work towards the goal of advancing wellbeing globally.

View the original article here: Science and NGO practice are closer that they appear

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